PR: Shortage of ‘good’ account managers?

The most recent PR Week reports a lack of good account managers in PR agencies. One of the main reasons behind this was the last recession of 2008 resulting in the cutting of training budgets. Account Executives have suffered due to the recession, they haven’t had the level of training their superiors have had the advantage of being exposed to. Of course this doesn’t apply to all agencies, but as reports show, we are likely to have a prolonged period of economic uncertainty and agencies need to be careful not to place themselves in a repeat situation. Training must be put high on the priority for agencies to see their more junior staff develop and grow within their agency to prepare them to be strong account managers. Training benefits companies who are facing tough economic times; it helps keep staff motivated, there’s return on investment and it is likely to improve staff retention. It will be interesting to see how agencies approach the issue of training with the predicated difficult economic times ahead.

Eddie Everard – Consultant

Has graduate unemployment reached saturation point?

The OECD yesterday (Monday) published figures that argued that the UK’s unemployment numbers are set to rise by 2013. Perhaps surprisingly, this may not come from graduates as the article below outlines a drop in graduate unemployment. The question, therefore, is where are these losses going to come from?

http://www.huffingtonpost.co.uk/sheila-flavell/graduate-employment-prospects-improved_b_1082014.html

Stuart Brill – Consultant

Reasons to Change Jobs BEFORE Christmas.

Often Candidates mention to us that they would like to change jobs but that they understand that, at this time of year, it would be better to hold off until after the Christmas break. The could not be more wrong! Here are the reasons why:

 

  • Many of our clients are very actively interviewing now, wanting to get their January starters lined up before Christmas starts. Waiting to apply next year will be leaving it too late.
  • In January there will be a glut of applicants when people return to work with post-Christmas blues. By applying now you get a step ahead of the crowd.
  • By starting a new job before Christmas you can have a gentle build up, getting to know the team (including the Christmas party!), having any training and induction etc. This means you can then make a flying start when you come back in the New Year.
  • Wouldn’t it be nice not to have returning to a job you don’t like hanging over you whilst you pull the crackers?!

Rupert Wallis – Director

Using Twitter to land you a job!

I fear I may be in the increasing minority when I say “I’ve never quite gotten my head around what purpose Twitter actually served”. Having recently taken part in a companywide “Twitter session”, we were educated by our in-house Twitter guru (Steven Dwyer), about how the Social Media platform could be used from a recruitment standpoint. I must confess, although deeply enlightened; I was still somewhat confused as to why it even existed. Why on earth would I want to “tweet” something I could easily mail shot, text or call the individual I wanted to tell?

 

That being said, there are 200 million users on twitter, so I must be missing something – right?

 

Being immersed within Social Media myself (bar Twitter), I decided to take the initiative, and try and learn how and why Twitter could benefit anyone in a finding a job. Unless it’s Alan Sugar you’re after, I dare say there aren’t many MD’s and HR people scouring their Twitter followers for top talent.

 

A very quick Google search proved otherwise, and I came across the article below.

http://www.forbes.com/sites/deborahljacobs/2011/11/15/how-to-tweet-your-way-to-a-new-job/

 

To my own surprise, I came across a number of articles about how various job seekers managed to “tweet” their way into a job, but this article in particular stood out to me due to the immediate turn around period from the initial contact via Twitter to a job offer being made (less than a week).

What was even more enlightening, was that our job seeker had applied for the exact same role through more conventional means (Monster.com) and had not heard anything back for almost a fortnight.

My naivety was short lived, and I was soon shown how the way many relationships are being formed, is gradually shifting.

As a recruiter, I’m aware that many candidates may not have LinkedIn accounts, or be all that keen on posting their personal details on Monster for the online world to see. Twitter can often act as a lead or a catalyst, to stir interest and strengthen relationships on both a social and professional level, thus providing a platform for both parties to discuss an opportunity in a very non committal and informal fashion.

So in essence, from a candidate’s perspective, following a top recruiters Twitter page can often result in a far easier and more concise method of keeping abreast of the latest vacancies and freelancing opportunities. Similarly to client’s who sees a  recruiter with a huge following may likely want to work with that recruiter as they seemingly have access to a larger and more varied talent pool.

 

Looking at things from a wider perspective, Social Media as a whole is increasingly becoming the first point of call for potential job seekers. The following article (http://techcrunch.com/2011/11/16/social-recruiting/) shows the results of a recent survey which indicates that LinkedIn and Facebook are becoming to two most commonly used networking sites in the search for employment. Twitter (although not mentioned), will play a key role in the way in which people now look for jobs, and interact with decision makers and industry peers.

 

So as I build my twitter following, and tweet my latest and very best vacancies, I’ll be eager to note my success in finding someone their perfect job role. I’d also be keen to see how quickly the recruitment landscape evolves and whether Social Media giants such as; Facebook and Twitter, adapt their services to accommodate this development. This could ultimately change the way in which we as recruiters, do our job.

Audley Swain – Consultant