How Media Recruiters Can Help Graduates Break Into The Media Industry

How Media Recruiters Can Help Graduates Break Into The Media Industry

It is that time of year again when the final academic term ends and floods of fresh talent hit the job market! As the media industry continues to evolve and expand in scope, it is becoming one of the hardest industries to break into. However, to have a good recruitment consultant on your side can really help you to find and apply for jobs in a more targeted and effective way. Whether you’re looking for a job as a medical writer or a conference producer, an account executive or want to try sales for example, as specialists they already know the key players, where the jobs are and how to get them, so they are the best people to get in touch with.

Skills and Experience

Graduates tend to have a unique skill set, they are naturally tech-savvy innovators and social media gurus; key skills that employers are seeking in this new digital age. However, a degree alone is not going to set you apart from other graduates, understanding the importance of gaining experience is vital and that is what will keep your CV from being brushed under the pile. Here at Media Contacts we hold CV workshops to show you what to include and how to present it, enabling you to put your best CV forward to employers.

Salary and Incentives

According to The Sutton Trust, who work to raise aspirations of young people from low income backgrounds, graduates leave UK universities with an average of £44,000 of debt! Comparing this figure to the average graduate annual salary of £18,000 – £22,000, it starts to become apparent how your first pay packet can be a harsh wake up call. However, most companies have great benefits packages, offering incentives including health insurance, pension schemes, free gym memberships and a generous amount of paid holiday. Media recruiters will fight your corner to negotiate you the best salary and incentives package, leaving you free to concentrate on other things.

Top Tips for Graduates

  • Social Media

Potential employers will look through your social media. FACT. So make sure it’s clean! Showcase your skills and experience in a professional manner that reflects what is on your CV. After all, if you’re are applying for jobs in PR but your LinkedIn page says you want to be a superhero, it doesn’t look good.

  • Experience

Determination is essential to break into a competitive industry, experience is critical when job hunting, therefore DO ANYTHING YOU CAN to get a head start while at university, even if it means taking on unpaid but relevant roles.

  • Know your stuff

As well as having experience within the industry, conduct some thorough research and find out relevant information from as many sources, including, but not limited to subscribing to industry magazines, attending graduate career fairs and asking people you know already if they have any contacts. This will help you to keep up to date with what is going on, who is who and which companies are doing what.

Media Contacts is one of the top media recruitment consultancies in London, you can contact us if you have any questions and our experienced consultants will be happy to help.

What Does It Take to Secure one of the Best Publishing Jobs in London?

Publishing jobs in London

 

Publishing has always been a hot sector, but with publishing jobs in London now more sought after than ever, how do you stand out from the competition?

 

Whilst there are always great publishing jobs in London, it can be extremely hard to land one when you are fresh out of university and looking for your first proper job. So how do you get ahead of the competition and show that you’re the one for the role? These are some of the attributes that will make a difference.

 

The Ability to Self-Publicise

Do your own PR: think of yourself as the brand and demonstrate your promotional skills throughout your CV and application. So don’t be bashful – present every skill, every bit of relevant experience and personal trait that you have in the best possible light. Remember that there may be hundreds of other applicants lining up for the few publishing jobs in London, so it’s not time to hold back. You might also consider some voluntary work, perhaps for a charity but if within a publishing team even better, through which you can get the essence of real life work experience which will be good addition to your portfolio.

 

Consider Other Locations

Yes, the publishing jobs in London tend to be the ones that everyone goes for, but there are plenty of other cities in the UK in which you can forge a rewarding publishing career. Look at Birmingham, Manchester and Leeds or Cambridge, for example, and build your contacts. There might be fewer jobs in the mix, but there are also likely to be fewer applicants per posting too, swinging the odds in your favour.

 

Broaden Your Skillset

The publishing jobs in London these days require more than the ability to engage with journalists, write press releases and hold launch events. Social media has made the industry far quicker and more exciting, so if you can demonstrate a real passion and aptitude for effective social media promotion and engagement, you will be at an advantage in the jobs market.

 

Consider Aligned Careers

The actual publishing roles are the obvious ones, but publishing houses all have a range of exciting professions that require similar skillsets. For example, you could work in sales, marketing, communications, rights, production and other areas. This will help to build your knowledge of how the industry works and make you more employable, and it will give you the chance to side-step into other roles of interest as you progress within your employer’s organisation. Often the trick is just to get into a company and then work hard to prove yourself and develop your career in the direction you want..

Interview questions for medical writer jobs

Medical writer

The world of medical writing is rewarding in terms of salary, opportunity and personal development.

The medical writing industry is experiencing rapid growth and if you have the right skills and desire to succeed you might want to consider medical writer jobs.

 

What does being a medical writer involve?

When you become a medical writer you could be working on a complex piece of new research transcription one minute, writing medical training materials for pharmaceutical businesses or manuscripts the next, then writing patient materials and conference reports the following week. The industry is diverse and interesting and offers great opportunities for those with a medical background and the ability to write good copy. There are also excellent opportunities for progression within the field, particularly if you can get noticed for your high-quality work and ability to deliver on time.

 

Recruitment process for medical writer jobs

Although it may vary from one company to another, the typical recruitment process for a medical writer vacancy will have two parts – a face-to-face interview and a written test. During the face to face interview, the recruitment manager/ senior medical writer will assess your attitude, experience, subject knowledge and expertise for the role.

 

Sample interview questions commonly asked for medical writer jobs

Here is a list of common interview questions for medical writer jobs which we have compiled based on our experience of recruiting for this sector as one of the top media recruitment agencies.

 

Medical writing related interview questions:

  • What interested you to go for medical writer jobs?
  • What is your long term career goal?
  • Rate your writing skills on a scale of 1 to 5?
  • Have any of your articles been published?
  • Have you completed any medical writing training or medical writing courses?
  • What do you know about the drug development process?
  • What kind of documents have you written previously?
  • What sort of documents do you think you are going to write in this position?
  • Which software are you proficient in?
  • Do you know anything about statistics?
  • Which projects have you worked on previously?
  • What is referencing and citation?
  • What are the different types of referencing styles? Which one do you use commonly?
  • What did you learn most from your projects?
  • What was your contribution in making those projects a success?
  • What would you keep in mind when starting to write a document from scratch?
  • What would you keep in mind when editing a document?
  • What is proof reading?
  • What are some publication guidelines?
  • What is your understanding of what a medical communications agency does?
  • What kind of salary are you looking for as a Medical writer?
  • What transferable skills have you acquired prior to becoming a medical writer?
  • How do you apply ISO 9001 for your medical writing position?
  • What are most common mistakes medical writers make and how do you solve them?

 

Personality and attitude related questions:

  • What did you least enjoy about your current role?
  • What part of your work so far do you think is most impactful?
  • What would be your ideal working environment?
  • How do you see your job relating to the overall goals?
  • How did you react when faced with constant time pressure?
  • Where do you see yourself in five years time?
  • What problems have you encountered at work?
  • How do you feel about taking no for an answer?
  • When given an important assignment, how do you approach it?
  • What was the most complex assignment you have had?
  • What are your weaknesses?
  • What are your strengths?
  • What has been your most disappointing experience?
  • What do you consider your greatest achievement in life?
  • What was the most difficult time of your life? How did you overcome it?
  • What motivates you?
  • What are your interests?
  • What do you think about team work? Are you a team player?
  • How would you handle a tough boss whom you think is being unreasonable?
  • Why did you apply for this job and specifically at our company?
  • Can you give me an example of your multi-tasking ability?
  • Can you handle pressure at work? How do you deal with it?
  • Do you prefer working independently or do you require constant supervision?
  • Can you write non-scientific documents as well?
  • What do you expect to gain from this job?
  • What’s your philosophy towards work?
  • What irritates you about co-employees?

 

Media Contacts is one of the best media recruitment agencies in the UK and have a dedicated team specialising in healthcare communications positions. Should you require assistance with your job search or if you are looking to hire your next medical writer, our experienced and friendly consultants can help! Contact us on 0207 359 8244 or email [email protected]

The Rewarding World of Medical Writing Jobs

The world of medical writer jobs is rewarding in terms of salary, opportunity and personal development.

 

The medical writing industry is experiencing rapid growth and offers excellent medical writing jobs for those with the right skills and desire to succeed.

 

What Does The Job Involve?

 

When you become a medical writer you could be working on a complex piece of new research transcriptions one minute, writing medical training materials for pharmaceutical businesses the next then writing patient materials and conference reports the following week. The industry is diverse and interesting and offers great opportunities for those with a medical background and the ability to write good copy. There are also excellent opportunities for progression within the field, particularly if you can get noticed for your high-quality work and ability to deliver on time.

 

Good Earning Potential

 

Jobs for medical writers often pay good salaries because of the skills and expertise required to carry out the job to a high standard, and because of the experience that the writer needs to have gained in the medical world beforehand. Medical communications agencies naturally pay more in London and the South because of the increased cost of living, but there are also some well-paid home-working and flexible-location roles, as well as freelance and contract opportunities. This makes the field very attractive to those looking to write part-time or around other commitments.

 

The Skills Needed

 

Primarily, you need to be an excellent writer with a background in the medical/pharmaceutical world. Some positions will require higher qualifications such as a doctorate in the relevant field, but the vast majority will simply require experience in medicine, as well as certain other qualifications. Generally, employers will require broad knowledge of typical scientific terms and jargon. Prior writing experience and a medical communications agency background are often preferred, whereas other employers are open to in-house pharma experience. Obviously attention to detail is essential, as is the ability to be a self-starter, work to deadlines and write compelling copy for a range of different audiences.

 

Entry Routes

The best way to find a good medical writer job is via a specialist recruitment agency in the field. The medical writing industry is diverse and fascinating. Your recruiter can assess your experience and skills and advise on the typical positions that could provide a good fit. Make sure you have a CV and a good covering letter ready. Most medical writer jobs will also require examples of your previous work, so a portfolio of your strongest pieces can also be an asset to securing the position you want.

Feel free to contact us if you need more information.

 

Medical writing in the “digital age”

 

How much has the role of medical writer changed over the past few years?

 

As many people working or interested in a career in medical or healthcare communications will know, digital communications are taking the industry by storm as pharmaceutical companies seek to reach patient groups and healthcare professionals in ever more innovative ways.  In the past couple of years, we’ve seen campaigns ranging from viral videos for disease awareness campaigns and augmented reality apps being used as sales aids and everything in between.  But what does this mean for the humble medical writer?  Has the job description of medical writer changed with the advance of digital media?

 

The answer is – no, not really.  The key skills are still the same and the qualities that employers look for haven’t drastically changed.  The core of the job is still to communicate clinical and scientific information in a way that is accessible and accurate.  It is still governed by regulations that are regularly updated.  What has changed is how the work that a medical writer produces is used.  In the “olden days”, a medical writer would focus exclusively on traditional print media or journals.  Now, the work produced by a medical writer is used for a much wider variety of both print and digital media.

 

 

Candidates and Employers

 

For those looking at starting a career in medical writing, the market is very favourable at the moment.  We’re seeing more entry-level roles, writing academies and internships and things are definitely looking up.

 

The qualities and qualifications that medical communications or healthcare communications agencies look for in potential medical writers has, as I mentioned, remained relatively unchanged.  You’ll need a life science degree, preferably a post-graduate degree (either MSc or PhD), some research experience and some writing experience.  This writing experience can be anything from your dissertation, thesis, published papers, blog, poetry…  The list is almost endless.

 

The market isn’t just looking up for the juniors – if you’ve got a bit of experience under your belt, the opportunities are available to get involved in something a little different, to head up a writing academy as a senior medical writer, to lead an award-winning team as a principal medical writer or make that move to a more creative medical copywriting role.

 

For employers as well, there is an expanding pool of talent of experienced hires with digital knowledge or talented juniors with a passion for all things digital.

 

Whether you’re an employer seeking the highest-quality medical writers or a job seeker searching for the latest medical writing jobs in your area, contact our highly qualified team to discuss your needs.

 

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